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What is Chi?

Chi, also commonly spelled ch'i, chi or qi, is a fundamental concept of everyday Chinese culture, most often defined as "air" or "breath" (for example, a term meaning "weather" is tian qi, or the "breath of heaven") and, by extension, "life force" or "spiritual energy" that is part of everything that exists. References to qi or similar philosophical concepts as a type of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings are used in many belief systems, especially in Asia.

Philosophical conceptions of qi date from the earliest recorded times in Chinese thinking. One of the important early figures in Chinese mythology is Huang Di or the Yellow Emperor. He is often considered a cultural hero who collected and formalized much of what subsequently became known as traditional Chinese medicine. Although the concept of qi has been very important within all Chinese philosophies, their descriptions of qi have been varied and conflicting.


Theories of traditional Chinese medicine assert that the body has natural patterns of qi associated with it that circulate in channels called meridians in English. Symptoms of various illnesses are often seen as the product of disrupted or unbalanced qi movement through such channels (including blockages), deficencies or imbalances of qi, in the various Zang Fu organs. Traditional Chinese Medicine seeks to relieve these imbalances by adjusting the flow of qi in the body using a variety of therapeutic techniques. Some of these techniques include herbal medicines, special diets, physical training regimens (qigong), massages to clear blockages, and acupuncture, which uses fine metal needles inserted into the skin to reroute or balance qi.

Traditional Asian martial arts also discuss qi. For instance, internal systems attempt to cultivate and direct qi during combat as well as to ensure proper health. Many other martial arts include some concept of qi in their philosophies.

Types of Chi: Shar Chi, Sheng Chi, Si Chi

Chi itself can broken up into different 'states'. In Feng Shui, you can transform the state of chi into another kind, usually for the better. Sheng Chi, is considered to be one the best and seen as positive chi. Si Chi is the exact opposite of Sheng Chi, many times referred to as negative chi. Shar Chi is considered to be harmful and is the source of most Feng Shui problems.

Chi Related Information
What is Shar Chi?
Shar Chi is what you can classify as harmful/killing energy. Shar Chi is primarily the result of negative surroundings and layouts. However, ill meaning entities such as competitors and unscrupulous people can also create additional shar chi in your surroundings. Because chi itself can be transformed...Read Entire Feng Shui Section

What is Sheng Chi?
Sheng Chi is a positive type of chi, moving gently (as opposed to Shar Chi which is the result of chi moving too fast in a straight line) and is considered uplifting and harmonious. Though physical locations such as houses, offices, and parks can have this auspicious form of chi, it is also possible...Read Entire Feng Shui Section

What is Si Chi?
Si Chi is stagnant or dying chi - reducing, lessening, fading and has an overall negative impact. It is considered to be the polar opposite of Sheng Chi, which is considered to be positive chi. Disorderly or decaying places/objects are considered to be strong sources of this negative type of chi...Read Entire Feng Shui Section

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